A Speech To The Pontifical Council For Justice and Peace – John J. Sweeney

A Speech To The Pontifical Council For Justice and Peace John J. Sweeney President, AFL-CIO Meeting of Trade Union Leaders Pontifical Council for Justice and Peace December 2-3, 1996

I. The principal problems for the world of work resulting from the process of globalization of the economy.
I want to thank Cardinal Etchegaray and the Pontifical Council for the great honor of participating in this meeting.
I am here as president of the AFL-CIO, the more than 13 million-member labor federation of the United States. As we do in our work every day, I will try to speak for the values and the interests of working Americans — people of every faith and viewpoint, union and non-union. And I will speak out of a deep belief that we share those concerns with our sisters and brothers throughout the world.
Cardinal Etchegaray has set the tone for this discussion in his article calling upon us all to “re-establish the concepts of solidarity and common responsibility as essential principles of the human endeavor.” As he writes, “These principles must be placed not just at the center of international development policy, but so much more so in the hearts of citizens and of societies, especially in the wealthier countries.” Read more

Reflection of Archbishop Diarmuid Martin to mark Workers Memorial Day 2010

Reflection of Archbishop Diarmuid Martin to mark Workers Memorial Day 2010

PRESS RELEASE
28 April 2010

Reflection of Archbishop Diarmuid Martin at Ceremony of the Irish Congress of Trade Unions in Dublin Castle to mark Workers Memorial Day 2010

People are at the heart of a modern economy.  A knowledge-based economy is driven, above all, by the creativity and capacity and innovation of people.    Investment in people is therefore the most significant long-term investment in building a solid economy.A people-centred approach to economy will also be one which does not separate economy and society.  Human creativity best emerges from a society where participation is fostered; human creativity best emerges from a society which invests in a focussed way in human capacity and talent.  A healthy society is one which invests in its people at every stage of their lives.

People are the natural wealth of any society and every person, young or old, should be enabled as far as possible to bring their contribution to society at the highest possible level for as long as possible.  Poverty is the inability to achieve God given talent.  It is not just lack of monetary ability.    Read more

4 Ideas Labor Unions Should Consider If They Want To Survive

4 Ideas Labor Unions Should Consider If They Want To Survive

A mural depicting scenes from Maine‘s labor history returned to public display in Jan. 2013, 22 months after Gov. Paul LePage set off a political firestorm and spawned a federal lawsuit by ordering it removed. (Clarke Canfield/AP)

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported last month that union membership fell significantly in 2012, to its lowest level since 1916. You can read the full report here. Read more

MARITIME LABOUR CONVENTION 2006: A Sign of Hope for the Maritime World

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People on the Move

N° 106 (Suppl.-I), April 2008

MARITIME LABOUR CONVENTION 2006:

A Sign of Hope for the Maritime World 

 

Comdr. Douglas B. Stevenson

The Seamen’s Church Institute of New York & New Jersey

Archbishop Marchetto, let me begin by thanking you for inviting me to be with you and with so many of my friends here in Gdynia, Poland.  I am very honored to have the opportunity to have a part in this important Congress and to share the Apostleship of the Sea’s vital ministry to seafarers throughout the world.

I have been asked to speak with you about the new International Labor Organization’s Maritime Labor Convention, 2006, or, more specifically, the MLC as a sign of hope for the maritime world.

I will begin my remarks by repeating some of the words spoken by Archbishop Silvano Tomasi to the International Labor Conference Plenary in Geneva on 23 February 2005 following the Convention’s adoption: Read more