Pope Benedict XIV – An appreciation

Pope Benedict XIV – An appreciation

Clayton Sinyai

When Joseph Cardinal Ratzinger became Benedict XVI, a number of “conservative” American Catholics seemed to nurse hopes that the new pope would distance the Church from its familiar social teaching on worker justice, labor unions and the regulation of the economy for the common good.

Benedict’s encyclical Caritas in Veritate proved deeply disappointing for such as these. “The repeated calls issued within the Church’s social doctrine, beginning with Rerum Novarum, for the promotion of workers’ associations that can defend their rights must… be honoured today even more than in the past,” the Pope instructed. Read more

ADDRESS OF HIS HOLINESS POPE BENEDICT XVI TO THE MEMBERS OF THE DIPLOMATIC CORPS ACCREDITED TO THE HOLY SEE

The Holy SeeADDRESS OF HIS HOLINESS POPE BENEDICT XVI
TO THE MEMBERS OF THE DIPLOMATIC CORPS
ACCREDITED TO THE HOLY SEE

Sala Regia
Monday, 7 January 2013

[Video]

Your Excellencies, Ladies and Gentlemen,

 As at the beginning of each New Year, I am happy to receive you, the distinguished Members of the Diplomatic Corps accredited to the Holy See, and to offer you my greetings and personal good wishes, which I extend to all the beloved nations which you represent, together with the assurance of my constant thoughts and prayers. I am especially grateful to your Dean, Ambassador Alejandro Valladares Lanza, and to your Vice-Dean, Ambassador Jean-Claude Michel, for the kind words which they addressed to me in the name of all. In a special way I wish to greet those who take part in this meeting for the first time. Your presence is a significant and valued sign of the fruitful relations which the Catholic Church entertains with civil authorities the world over. It involves a dialogue which has at heart the integral spiritual and material good of each man and woman, and seeks to advance their transcendent dignity everywhere. As I stated in my Address on the occasion of the last Ordinary Public Consistory for the creation of new Cardinals: “the Church, from its origins, is oriented kat’holon, it embraces the whole universe”, and with it each people, each culture and each tradition. This “orientation” does not represent an intrusion in the life of the different societies, but serves rather to illumine the right conscience of their citizens, encouraging them to work for the good of each person and for the progress of the human race. It is in this context, and with the aim of fostering fruitful cooperation between Church and State in the service of the common good, that in the past year bilateral Accords were signed between the Holy See and Burundi, and with Equatorial Guinea, and the Accord with Montenegro was ratified. In this same spirit, the Holy See takes part in the work of various International Organizations and Institutions. In this regard, I am pleased that this past December its request to become an Extra-regional Observer in the Central American Integration System was accepted, not least by reason of the contribution which the Catholic Church offers in several sectors of the societies of that region. The visits of the various Heads of State and of Government whom I received in the course of the past year, as well as the memorable Apostolic Journeys which I made to Mexico, Cuba and Lebanon, were privileged occasions for reaffirming the civil commitment of Christians in those countries, and for promoting the dignity of the human person and the foundations of peace. Read more

ADDRESS OF HIS HOLINESS POPE BENEDICT XVI TO THE MEMBERS OF THE DIPLOMATIC CORPS ACCREDITED TO THE HOLY SEE

Go to Google HomeADDRESS OF HIS HOLINESS POPE BENEDICT XVI
TO THE MEMBERS OF THE DIPLOMATIC CORPS
ACCREDITED TO THE HOLY SEE

Sala Regia
Monday, 7 January 2013

VIDEO

Your Excellencies, Ladies and Gentlemen,

As at the beginning of each New Year, I am happy to receive you, the distinguished Members of the Diplomatic Corps accredited to the Holy See, and to offer you my greetings and personal good wishes, which I extend to all the beloved nations which you represent, together with the assurance of my constant thoughts and prayers. I am especially grateful to your Dean, Ambassador Alejandro Valladares Lanza, and to your Vice-Dean, Ambassador Jean-Claude Michel, for the kind words which they addressed to me in the name of all. In a special way I wish to greet those who take part in this meeting for the first time. Your presence is a significant and valued sign of the fruitful relations which the Catholic Church entertains with civil authorities the world over. It involves a dialogue which has at heart the integral spiritual and material good of each man and woman, and seeks to advance their transcendent dignity everywhere. As I stated in my Address on the occasion of the last Ordinary Public Consistory for the creation of new Cardinals: “the Church, from its origins, is oriented kat’holon, it embraces the whole universe”, and with it each people, each culture and each tradition. This “orientation” does not represent an intrusion in the life of the different societies, but serves rather to illumine the right conscience of their citizens, encouraging them to work for the good of each person and for the progress of the human race. It is in this context, and with the aim of fostering fruitful cooperation between Church and State in the service of the common good, that in the past year bilateral Accords were signed between the Holy See and Burundi, and with Equatorial Guinea, and the Accord with Montenegro was ratified. In this same spirit, the Holy See takes part in the work of various International Organizations and Institutions. In this regard, I am pleased that this past December its request to become an Extra-regional Observer in the Central American Integration System was accepted, not least by reason of the contribution which the Catholic Church offers in several sectors of the societies of that region. The visits of the various Heads of State and of Government whom I received in the course of the past year, as well as the memorable Apostolic Journeys which I made to Mexico, Cuba and Lebanon, were privileged occasions for reaffirming the civil commitment of Christians in those countries, and for promoting the dignity of the human person and the foundations of peace. Read more

In Christmas message, Pope extends Christ’s peace to the world

In Christmas message, Pope extends Christ’s peace to the world

Vatican City, Dec 25, 2012 / 09:55 am (CNA/EWTN News).- Pope Benedict outlined the power of faith and pointed to Christ coming in the flesh as the source of hope and peace for society in his annual “Urbi et Orbi” or, “The city and to the world,” message on Christmas day.

God has done everything; he has done the impossible: he was made flesh,” the Pope emphasized.

“His all-powerful love has accomplished something which surpasses all human understanding: the Infinite has become a child, has entered the human family.”

During his remarks, the Pope also appealed for an end to violence in conflict ravaged countries in the world such as Syria and the Democratic Republic of Congo, called for a peaceful democratic transition in Egypt and urged respect for religious freedom in China. Read more

Pope reflects on finding faith in a secular world

Pope reflects on finding faith in a secular world

By Matthew A. Rarey
Pope Benedict XVI holds his Wednesday general audience on Nov. 7, 2012 in St. Peter’s Square. Credit: Matthew Rarey-CNA.

Vatican City, Nov 7, 2012 / 01:49 pm (CNA/EWTN News).- Pope Benedict XVI continued his series of teachings on faith by observing that although secularism is on the rise, everyone has a desire for God, and this can be seen in the experience of love.

“Even in today’s secularized society, this desire for God continues to make itself felt, above all in the experience of love,” he told thousands of pilgrims assembled in St. Peter’s Square for the Nov. 7 general audience. Read more

RELIGION REMINDS SOCIETY OF OBJECTIVE MORAL NORMS

RELIGION REMINDS SOCIETY OF OBJECTIVE MORAL NORMS

Vatican City, 15 October 2012 (VIS) – On 14 October, Fr. Miguel Angel Ayuso Guixot M.C.C.J., secretary of the Pontifical Council for Inter-religious Dialogue, addressed the Istanbul World Forum, dedicated to the theme: “Justice and the Construction of a New Global Order”. In his remarks during the meeting, which took place from 13 to 14 October, Fr. Ayuso examined the essential contribution that social justice and religious freedom make to peace, and the indispensable role religions have in promoting peace and justice in global society.

“Religion”, said Fr. Ayuso speaking English, “has a role in contributing to the national conversation of any given society. That conversation needs to engage with all the complexities that societies face in the modem world. Concepts such as ‘justice’ and ‘social justice’ are an integral part of that conversation. Thus, we ask ourselves, what is the contribution of religion to the national conversation about ‘justice’ and ‘social justice’? Justice is a divine attribute, and religious teaching certainly contributes to the reflection on the right ordering of relationships, in other words, social justice. Catholic tradition, however, maintains that justice is accessible by means of human reason, to all men and women of goodwill, both religious and non religious”. Read more

ANGELUS: THE RICH MUST ENTER INTO THE LOGIC OF GOD

ANGELUS: THE RICH MUST ENTER INTO THE LOGIC OF GOD

Vatican City, 14 October 2012 (VIS) – “God can conquer the heart of a person with many possessions and lead him towards solidarity and sharing with the poor and needy, so that he can enter into the logic of giving”, said the Pope commenting on today’s Gospel reading which narrates Jesus’ meeting with a rich young man.

“Jesus teaches that it is very difficult but not impossible for a rich person to enter the kingdom of God“, said the Holy Father in his remarks before praying the Angelus. “Indeed, through the ‘the logic of giving’, a person may follow the path of Jesus Christ Who, as the Apostle Paul wrote, ‘for your sake … became poor although he was rich, so that by his poverty you might become rich'”. Read more