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Is capitalism moral?

Is capitalism moral?

By , Published: March 15

Steven Pearlstein is a Washington Post business and economics columnist and a professor of public and international affairs at George Mason University.

Careening from debt-ceiling crisis to sequestration to a looming government shutdown, the nation is caught up in a historic debate over the proper size and role of government.

That’s certainly one way to think about it. Another is that we are caught up in a historic debate over free-market capitalism. After all, if markets were making most of us better off, regulating their own excesses, guaranteeing equal opportunity and fairly dividing the economic pie, then we wouldn’t need government to take on all the things it does.

For most of the past 30 years, the world has been moving in the direction of markets. The grand experiment with communism has been thoroughly discredited, a billion people have been lifted from poverty through free-market competition, and even European socialists have given up on state ownership and the nanny state. Read more

On All of Our Shoulders

On All of Our Shoulders

Table of Contents:

  •  A Tipping Point

  • A Threat to the Church’s Teachings

  • Prudence Misused

  • Prudence and Principle, Love and Truth

  • Prudence and Policy

  • 5 Principles of Catholic Social Doctrine Most in Danger of Being Forgotten or Distorted

  • Conclusion

 We write as Catholic theologians, academics and ministers concerned for our nation and for the integrity of the teachings of the Roman Catholic Church. We write to hold up aspects of the Church’s social doctrine that are profoundly relevant to the challenges our nation faces at this moment in history, yet are in danger of being ignored. At a moment when the ideas of Atlas Shrugged influence public debate and policy, we write to proclaim the Catholic truth that the stewardship of common good rests upon all of our shoulders together. This is a responsibility we dare not shrug. We fulfill this obligation in myriad ways, but indispensibly among them, through the policies of our government. We highlight these principles of the Church’s social doctrine in the hope that their substance will better influence our political and policy debates. Read more