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CATHOLIC THEOLOGY OF WORK AND WORSHIP

CATHOLIC THEOLOGY OF WORK AND WORSHIP

REV. JOHN A. PERRICONE, Ph.D., Fordham  University; Executive Director, Christi Fideles.

Perricone, Rev. John A. (1999) “Catholic Theology of Work and Worship,” St. John’s Law Review: Vol. 73: Iss. 3, Article 10.

In Frederick Nietzsche’s Thus Spake Zarathustra1 , Zarathustra is asked about his happiness. He replies, “Do I then strive after happiness? I strive after my work.”‘  In this phrase, Nietzsche correctly identified one of the extremes in which modernity conceives the nature of man: Man is his work.

The unfortunate result of this conception of man is that work does not furnish happiness. Happiness is the result of reposing in the possession of an end or purpose, which here is always being striven for, but never achieved. Since God alone is that which gives life purpose, absent God purposefulness vanishes. Modernity has exiled God from its world. Work is performed for its own sake and carries no gratification.  Read more

Cardinal Dolan and Stephen Colbert talk faith at Fordham

Cardinal Dolan and Stephen Colbert talk faith at Fordham

Cardinal Timothy Dolan greets the press in Rome in March 2012.

Washington D.C., Sep 19, 2012 / 05:47 pm (CNA).- Fordham University students were treated to a rare opportunity last week when they packed an auditorium to hear Cardinal Timothy M. Dolan and television comedian Stephen Colbert trade jokes and discuss faith.

Cardinal Dolan told Colbert that “part of my admiration for you is that, while you often tease and joke about your faith and the Church, there’s no denying that you take your faith seriously, and look to the Church as your spiritual family.”

“In fact, when I met you last spring at a very glitzy gathering where you were the MC, the first thing you said to me was, ‘Cardinal Dolan, tomorrow night I’ll be with my son as he receives the sacrament of confirmation. Say a prayer for him, would you?’” Read more