Posts

Pope says everyone can do good, regardless of belief

Pope says everyone can do good, regardless of belief

Vatican City, May 22, 2013 / 04:03 pm (CNA/EWTN News).- Every human person despite his or her beliefs can do good, and a sharing in good works is the prime place for encounter among those who disagree, Pope Francis said at his Mass today.

“The Lord created us in his image and likeness, and we are the image of the Lord, and he does good and all of us have this commandment at heart: do good and avoid evil. All of us,” the Pope taught in his homily May 22 at St. Martha’s residence in the Vatican.

“We must meet one another doing good. ‘But I don’t believe, Father, I am an atheist!’ But do good: we will meet one another there.” Read more

Spirituality of Work

Spirituality of Work

(A chapter from the book, Confident and Competent – A Challenge for the Lay Church, William L. Droel and Gregory F. Augustine Pierce, 1987. Reprinted with permission from ACTA Publications, Chicago, Illinois)

So God created human beings, making them to be like himself. He created them, and said, “Have many children, so that your descendants will live all over the earth and bring it under their control.” – Genesis 1:27-28

Laypeople must realize that their daily work is the primary means by which they help bring about the kingdom of God. Any spirituality which detracts or distracts from work is therefore counterproductive.

In the final sentences of his encyclical On Human Work, Pope John Paul II wrote: “Let the Christian who listens to the living word of God, uniting work with prayer, know the place work has not only in earthly progress but also in the development of the kingdom of God, to which we are called through the power of the Holy Spirit and through the word of the gospel.”1 Read more

Pope Francis reflects on the dignity of work at Wednesday’s general audience

Vatican Radio

Pope Francis reflects on the dignity of work at Wednesday’s general audience

 

 

Pope Francis in his catechesis on the feast of St. Joseph the Worker on May 1st reflected on two important figures in the life of Jesus: the figure of St. Joseph as the model of all workers and on Mary as we mark the beginning of the month dedicated to the mother of Jesus. Pope FRancis in comments in Italian spoke about the dignity and importance of work.

Listen to Emer McCarthy’s report including Wednesday morning’s mass

Below a Vatican Radio transcript and translation of the Holy Father’s Wednesday Audience catechesis:

Dear brothers and sisters, Good Day!,

Today, May 1st, we celebrate Saint Joseph the Worker and begin the month traditionally dedicated to Our Lady. In our encounter this morning, I want to focus on these two figures, so important in the life of Jesus, the Church and in our lives, with two brief thoughts: the first on work, the second on the contemplation of Jesus Read more

Pope: Dignity for the Dhaka workers, dignity for the jobless

Vatican Radio

Pope: Dignity for the Dhaka workers, dignity for the jobless

 

 

(Vatican Radio) A society that “does not pay a just wage”, that “does not give work” to people; a society that “that only looks to its balance books, that only seeks profit” is unjust and goes against God. It is work – not power, not money, not culture – that gives men and women a sense of dignity. By stripping them of work, society strips them of their God given dignity. Emer McCarthy reports: http://media01.radiovaticana.va/audiomp3/00369662.MP3

This was the focus of Pope Francis reflections at Mass Wednesday May 1st. The Holy Father marked the feast of St Joseph the Worker together with children and single mothers who are guests at the “Il Ponte” center for solidarity based in the port town of Civitavecchia north of Rome. Mass was concelebrated by the man who founded and runs the center for these families in need, Fr. Egidio Smacchia. Read more

Vatican: Passion of Our Lord Sermon [Full text]

Vatican Radio

Vatican: Passion of Our Lord Sermon [Full text]

(Vatican Radio) In silent procession, wearing red vestments, Pope Francis made his way down the nave of St Peter’s basilica as the sunset over the dome on Friday evening. There before the High Altar, he lay prostrate in prayer. This was the opening act of the liturgy of Our Lord’s Passion, the central commemoration of Good Friday, the memorial of Christ’s suffering and death for the salvation of mankind.

Emer McCarthy reports:

The Holy Father stood as three deacons, two Franciscans and a Dominican, chanted the account of the Passion according to St. John. As is tradition, the papal preacher, Capuchin Father Raniero Cantalamessa, delivered the Good Friday Sermon, this year titled “Justified as a Gift through Faith in the Blood of Christ”. Read more

Pope: Mass of Our Lord’s Supper [Full text]

Vatican Radio

Pope: Mass of Our Lord’s Supper [Full text]

(Vatican Radio) The Washing of the Feet, or Mandatum, is an integral part of the Holy Thursday liturgy, the Missa in Coena Domini, or Mass of Our Lord’s Supper, which opens the East erTriduum

The Washing of the Feet is a sign of service. Or as Pope Francis told about 40 young detainees gathered around him for Mass in an inner city detention center, it is “Christ’s caress, because Jesus came just for this, to serve us, to help us”. Emer McCarthy reports:

On Thursday evening as the sun set over a rain washed Rome, Pope Francis crossed the Tiber River bound for the city’s juvenile prison, Casal del Marmo, which roughly translated into English reads, ‘Marble Home’. Read more

Holy Week is time to follow Jesus in search of lost sheep, pope says

POPE-AUDIENCE Mar-27-2013 (760 words) With photos. xxxi

Holy Week is time to follow Jesus in search of lost sheep, pope says

By Cindy Wooden
Catholic News Service

VATICAN CITY (CNS) — Holy Week is a time to follow Jesus out of one’s parish or group and out of one’s comfort zone to go with him in search of the lost sheep, Pope Francis said.

“There is such a great need to bring (people) the living presence of Jesus, who is merciful and rich in love,” the pope said March 27 at his weekly general audience in St. Peter’s Square.

The pope began very simply, saying in Italian: “Good morning. I’m happy to welcome you to my first general audience.” Read more

Pope Francis and creation

Vatican Radio

 

Pope Francis and creation

(Vatican Radio) Since the beginning of his Pontificate, Pope Francis has spoken of the importance of protecting creation. At his Installation Mass on Tuesday the Holy Father said, “let us be “protectors” of creation, protectors of God’s plan inscribed in nature, protectors of one another and of the environment.”

Speaking about Pope Francis’ message, FAO Assistant Director-General of Forests, Eduardo Rojas-Briales says, “His predecessor Benedict XVI had already started a very important environmental discourse.”

Pope Francis, he continued, has “strengthened this linkage between the religious message as well as the need to keep creation and to keep nature in a good state.”

Listen to Lydia O’Kane’s interview with Eduardo Rojas-Briales

 

Pope Francis: What’s in a Name? 3 Priorities for the Church

Pope Francis: What’s in a Name? 3 Priorities for the Church

In this touching video, Pope Francis explains to journalists the reasons he chose the name “Francis” for his papacy.  It is clear to me this was a Spirit-led moment in which he responded to what he felt were several of the most-pressing needs in our modern world.  Expressing his longing that the Church become poor and for the poor, he described the charism of Francis:  “the man of peace, the man of the poor, the man who loves and guards creation.”

What happened in those few minutes he describes as the final conclave votes were counted was that the Pope’s heart was moved by the suggestion of a friend to choose a name that represents exactly what the world needs most right now: peace, solidarity with the poor, and care for the environment. Read more

Thoughts from a Working Person’s Pope

Faith and Work in Cyberspace–April 18, 2005

Thoughts from a Working Person’s Pope

(from Initiatives special edition number 148)

Greg Pierce – National Center for the Laity and ACTA Publishing 

Lost amid the accolades about Pope John Paul II might be his greatest legacy: his theology and spirituality of work. Below are 10 great quotes from JPII that show the depth and breadth of his understanding of work. In my opinion, this will be his greatest legacy.  

These quotes are from the special issue of the Initiatives newsletter put out by cyberspacer Bill Droel for the National Center for the Laity. If you want to receive a copy of that newsletter, either electronically or in hard copy, please send me an e-mail and I will have it forwarded to you. (Any cyberspacer worth his or her salt already subscribes to Initiatives, of course.)

Here are my favorite quotes from Pope John Paul II on work:  Read more