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A Catholic Framework for Economic Life

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A Catholic Framework for Economic Life

“A Catholic Framework for Economic Life” offers ten key principles to help Catholics reflect on the values that should shape our participation in economic life. It was written by the bishops of the United States based on the Catechism of the Catholic Church, papal encyclicals, the pastoral letter Economic Justice for All, and other statements of the U.S. Catholic bishops.

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As followers of Jesus Christ and participants in a powerful economy, Catholics in the United States are called to work for greater economic justice in the face of persistent poverty, growing income-gaps, and increasing discussion of economic issues in the United States and around the world.  We urge Catholics to use the following ethical framework for economic life as principles for reflection, criteria for judgment and directions for action.  These principles are drawn directly from Catholic teaching on economic life. Read more

RELIGION REMINDS SOCIETY OF OBJECTIVE MORAL NORMS

RELIGION REMINDS SOCIETY OF OBJECTIVE MORAL NORMS

Vatican City, 15 October 2012 (VIS) – On 14 October, Fr. Miguel Angel Ayuso Guixot M.C.C.J., secretary of the Pontifical Council for Inter-religious Dialogue, addressed the Istanbul World Forum, dedicated to the theme: “Justice and the Construction of a New Global Order”. In his remarks during the meeting, which took place from 13 to 14 October, Fr. Ayuso examined the essential contribution that social justice and religious freedom make to peace, and the indispensable role religions have in promoting peace and justice in global society.

“Religion”, said Fr. Ayuso speaking English, “has a role in contributing to the national conversation of any given society. That conversation needs to engage with all the complexities that societies face in the modem world. Concepts such as ‘justice’ and ‘social justice’ are an integral part of that conversation. Thus, we ask ourselves, what is the contribution of religion to the national conversation about ‘justice’ and ‘social justice’? Justice is a divine attribute, and religious teaching certainly contributes to the reflection on the right ordering of relationships, in other words, social justice. Catholic tradition, however, maintains that justice is accessible by means of human reason, to all men and women of goodwill, both religious and non religious”. Read more