Posts

EVANGELII GAUDIUM

APOSTOLIC EXHORTATION
EVANGELII GAUDIUM
OF THE HOLY FATHER
FRANCIS
TO THE BISHOPS, CLERGY,
CONSECRATED PERSONS
AND THE LAY FAITHFUL
ON THE PROCLAMATION OF THE GOSPEL
IN TODAY’S WORLD

INDEX

I. A JOY EVER NEW, A JOY WHICH IS SHARED [2-8]
II. THE DELIGHTFUL AND COMFORTING JOY OF EVANGELIZING [9-13]

Eternal newness [11-13]

III. THE NEW EVANGELIZATION FOR THE TRANSMISSION OF THE FAITH [14-18]

The scope and limits of this Exhortation [16-18]

CHAPTER ONE
THE CHURCH’S MISSIONARY TRANSFORMATION [19]

I. A CHURCH WHICH GOES FORTH [20-24]

Taking the first step, being involved and supportive, bearing fruit and rejoicing [24]

II. PASTORAL ACTIVITY AND CONVERSION [25-33]

An ecclesial renewal which cannot be deferred [27-33]

III. FROM THE HEART OF THE GOSPEL [34-39]

IV. A MISSION EMBODIED WITHIN HUMAN LIMITS [40-45]

V. A MOTHER WITH AN OPEN HEART [46-49]

CHAPTER TWO
AMID THE CRISIS OF COMMUNAL COMMITMENT [50-51]

I. SOME CHALLENGES OF TODAY’S WORLD [52-75]

No to an economy of exclusion [53-54]
No to the new idolatry of money
[55-56]
No to a financial system which rules rather than serves
[57-58]
No to the inequality which spawns violence
[59-60]
Some cultural challenges
[61-67]
Challenges to inculturating the faith
[68-70]
Challenges from urban cultures
[71-75]

II. TEMPTATIONS FACED BY PASTORAL WORKERS [76-109]

Yes to the challenge of a missionary spirituality [78-80]
No to selfishness and spiritual sloth
[81-83]
No to a sterile pessimism
[84-86]
Yes to the new relationships brought by Christ
[87-92]
No to spiritual worldliness
[93-97]
No to warring among ourselves
[98-101]
Other ecclesial challenges
[102-109]

CHAPTER THREE
THE PROCLAMATION OF THE GOSPEL [110]

I. THE ENTIRE PEOPLE OF GOD PROCLAIMS THE GOSPEL [111-134]

A people for everyone [112-114]
A people of many faces
[115-118]
We are all missionary disciples
[119-121]
The evangelizing power of popular piety
[122-126]
Person to person
[127-129]
Charisms at the service of a communion which evangelizes
[130-131]
Culture, thought and education
[132-134]

II. THE HOMILY [135-144]

The liturgical context [137-138]
A mother’s conversation
[139-141]
Words which set hearts on fire
[142-144]

III. PREPARING TO PREACH [145-159]

Reverence for truth [146-148]
Personalizing the word
[149-151]
Spiritual reading
[152-153]
An ear to the people
[154-155]
Homiletic resources
[156-159]

IV. EVANGELIZATION AND THE DEEPER UNDERSTANDING OF THE KERYGMA [160- 175]

Kerygmatic and mystagogical catechesis [163-168]
Personal accompaniment in processes of growth
[169-173]
Centred on the word of God
[174-175]

CHAPTER FOUR
THE SOCIAL DIMENSION OF EVANGELIZATION [176]

I. COMMUNAL AND SOCIETAL REPERCUSSIONS OF THE KERYGMA [177-185]

Confession of faith and commitment to society [178-179]
The kingdom and its challenge
[180-181]
The Church’s teaching on social questions
[182-185]

II. THE INCLUSION OF THE POOR IN SOCIETY [186-216]

In union with God, we hear a plea [187-192]
Fidelity to the Gospel, lest we run in vain
[193-196]
The special place of the poor in God’s people
[197-201]
The economy and the distribution of income
[202-208]
Concern for the vulnerable
[209-216]

III. THE COMMON GOOD AND PEACE IN SOCIETY [217-237]

Time is greater than space [222-225]
Unity prevails over conflict
[226-230]
Realities are more important than ideas
[231-233]
The whole is greater than the part
[234-237]

IV. SOCIAL DIALOGUE AS A CONTRIBUTION TO PEACE [238-258]

Dialogue between faith, reason and science [242-243]
Ecumenical dialogue
[244-246]
Relations with Judaism
[247-249]
Interreligious dialogue
[250-254]
Social dialogue in a context of religious freedom
[255-258]

CHAPTER FIVE
SPIRIT-FILLED EVANGELIZERS [259-261]

I. REASONS FOR A RENEWED MISSIONARY IMPULSE [262-283]

Personal encounter with the saving love of Jesus [264-267]
The spiritual savour of being a people
[268-274]
The mysterious working of the risen Christ and his Spirit
[275-280]
The missionary power of intercessory prayer
[281-283]

II. MARY, MOTHER OF EVANGELIZATION [284-288]

Jesus’ gift to his people [285-286]
Star of the new evangelization
[287-288]

Justice and Peace Council holds conference on faith and politics

Vatican Radio

Justice and Peace Council holds conference on faith and politics

(Vatican Radio) A first international meeting of chaplains serving in Parliaments is taking place at the Pontifical Justice and Peace Council this week, reflecting on ways of supporting Catholics engaged in political life.
The encounter, entitled ‘Pastoral Care of Politicians: Spiritual Companionship and Promotion of the Common Good’, was opened on Thursday by Council President, Cardinal Peter Turkson, who spoke of “new and serious issues” facing those searching for a right relationship between Christian faith and political decision making.
During a break in the meeting, Philippa Hitchen caught up with Cardinal Turkson to find out more about the goals of the two day conference:

Listen: RealAudioMP3

Please find below the text of Cardinal Turkson’s introduction to the meeting:

Your Excellencies, Rev. Fathers, Distinguished Speakers and Participants, dear friends:

1. It is a joy for me to welcome you to the Pontifical Council for Justice and Peace for this first meeting of chaplains serving parliaments. Thank you for making yourselves available for these two days of discussion and labour. Let me especially thank the speakers who have agreed to enrich our reflections.

2. We are gathered here to celebrate the fiftieth anniversary of Vatican II. As we begin our deliberations, we cannot avoid thinking of the emphasis in Gaudium et Spes on participation in the political sphere: “There is no better way to establish political life on a truly human basis than by fostering an inward sense of justice and kindliness, and of service to the common good, and by strengthening basic convictions as to the true nature of the political community and the aim, right exercise, and sphere of action of public authority.” The mission of priests involved in various ways with political figures fits into this desire of Vatican II. This mission is not only one of defending particular positions, even if it is sometimes necessary to do so. Above all, it is imperative to assist those in public life to give their political engagement proper foundations and direction in an interiorized manner, through reflection and prayer, rather than leaving it merely to formal conventions. Read more

Greed destroys, money is God’s gift to use to help others, pope says

Greed destroys, money is God’s gift to use to help others, pope says


By Carol Glatz Catholic News Service

POPE-MONEY Oct-21-2013 (350 words) xxxi

VATICAN CITY (CNS) — Money by itself isn’t a problem, but greed and an attachment to money cause evil and destroy families and relationships, Pope Francis said.

“Money is needed to bring about many good things,” he said in his morning Mass homily Oct. 21, “but when your heart is attached (to money), it destroys you.”

“How many destroyed families have we seen because of money problems, sibling against sibling, father against child,” he said during the Mass in the Domus Sanctae Marthae, according to Vatican Radio. Read more

John XXIII – ‘Mater et Magistra’ to ‘Pacem in Terris’

Vatican Radio

John XXIII – ‘Mater et Magistra’ to ‘Pacem in Terris’


 

 

 

(Vatican Radio) Thursday 11th of April 2013 marked half a century since Blessed John XXIII published his encyclical ‘Pacem in Terris’.

This encyclical, which as the Latin title indicates focuses on peace on earth, called for social and international peace. With this document which can be perceived as John XXIII’s last testament, published as it was only a couple of months before his death, he broke new ground. Read more

Pope at audience: Counter a culture of waste with solidarity

Vatican Radio

Pope at audience: Counter a culture of waste with solidarity

(Vatican Radio) When stock markets drop ten points its ‘a tragedy’ but starving children, homeless people dying on our streets, people disposed of like trash – such as the unborn or the elderly – has become the norm.

This is the result of a culture of waste, of our being unable to ‘read the signs’ of God’s creation, His free gift to us, and of allowing money and not man rule society. A culture of solidarity should prevail over our culture of waste, because when we care for and cultivate creation – including the human person – when we share our resources, we all have enough.

This Wednesday Pope Francis dedicated his general audience with thousands of pilgrims and visitors to St Peter’s square to the UN World Environment Day. Emer McCarthy reports: Read more

World environment day: Tackling climate change

Vatican Radio

World environment day: Tackling climate change

(Vatican Radio) June 5th is World Environment Day which is being marked Wednesday all around the globe. The theme for this year is Think.Eat.Save. According to the UN 1.3 billion tonnes of food is wasted every year.

At the same time, 1 in every 7 people in the world go to bed hungry and more than 20,000 children under the age of 5 die daily from hunger. Read more

Vatican: Dhaka factory collapse underscores need for global corporate social responsibility

Vatican Radio

Vatican: Dhaka factory collapse underscores need for global corporate social responsibility

(Vatican Radio) With the images of the Dhaka factory collapse in Bangladesh still before the eyes of the world, the Holy See has reminded United Nations members that “still in our own day the number of human lives that are lost or severely crushed as a result of unsafe working conditions remains too great”.

Below please find the statement by Archbishop Silvano M. Tomasi Permanent Observer of the Holy See to the UN and Other International Organizations in Geneva at the 23rd Session of the Human Rights Council

“Transnational Corporations and Human Rights”

Geneva, May 31, 2013
Mr. President,

The urgency of the call to increased Corporate Social and Environmental Responsibility was elevated to a new pitch for all stakeholders when the news about the collapse of a garment factory on the outskirts of Dhaka on April 24th spread rapidly around the world. The loss of more than 1,100 young lives coupled with the untold pain of their relatives, and the suffering and crushed dreams of hundreds more is a reminder of corrective actions that need to be undertaken by all corporations that participate in a global supply chain process that relies continually on the contribution of workers. The images of that disaster are also a reminder of the interdependence that globalization has brought about in transnational economic activity. Read more

Pope Francis at Mass: be salt of the earth

Vatican Radio

Pope Francis at Mass: be salt of the earth


 

 

 

(Vatican Radio) That Christians might spread the spiritual salt of faith, hope and charity: this was Pope Francis’ exhortation at Mass Thursday morning in the chapel of the Domus Sanctae Marthae residence in the Vatican. The Pope warned against the risk of becoming insipid, “Museum-piece Christians.”

In his homily, Pope Francis focused on the savour that Christians are called to give to their own lives and to others’. The Holy Father said that salt the Lord gives us is the salt of faith, hope and charity. But, he warned, we must be careful that this salt, which is given to us by the certainty that Jesus died and rose again to save us, “does not lose its flavour, does not lose its strength.” This salt, he continued, “is not for keeping, because if the salt is preserved in a bottle it does not do anything: it is good for nothing”:

Salt makes sense when you [use] it in order to make things more tasty. I also consider that salt stored in the bottle, with moisture, loses strength and is rendered useless. The salt that we have received is to be given out, to be given away, [in order] to spice things up: otherwise, it becomes bland and useless. We must ask the Lord not to [let us] become Christians with flavour-less salt, with salt that stays closed in the bottle. Salt also has another special feature: when salt is used well, one does not notice the taste of salt. The savour of salt – it cannot be perceived! What one tastes is the flavour of the food: salt helps improve the flavor of the meal.

“When we preach faith, with this salt,” said Pope Francis, “those who receive the proclamation, receive it each according to his peculiarity, as [happens when salt is used judiciously] on food.” So, “Each with his own peculiarities receives the salt and becomes better [for it].” The Holy Father went on to explain that the “originality” that Christian faith brings is therefore not something uniform:

The Christian originality is not a uniformity! It takes each one as he is, with his own personality, with his own characteristics, his culture – and leaves him with that, because it is a treasure. However, it gives one something more: it gives flavour! This Christian originality is so beautiful, because when we want to make a uniformity – all salted in the same way – things will be like when the woman throws in too much salt and one tastes only salt and not the meal. The Christian originality is this: each is as he is, with the gifts the Lord has given him.

“This,” the Pope continued, “is the salt that we have to give.” A salt that is “not to be kept, but to be given,” – and this, he said, “means a little [bit] of transcendence”: “To get out there with the message, to get out there with this richness that we have in salt, and give it to others.” On the other hand, he pointed out, there are two “ways out” for the salt to take, so that it does not spoil. First: to give the salt “in the service of meals, service to others, to serve the people.” Second: “transcendence toward the author of the salt, the creator.” The salt, he reiterated, “in order to keep its flavour, has need not only of being given through preaching,” but, “also needs the other transcendence, of prayer, of adoration”:

In this way is the salt conserved, [in this way it keeps] its flavor. With the worship of the Lord I go beyond myself to the Lord, and with the proclamation of the Gospel I go out of myself to give the message. If we do not do this, however – these two things, these two transcendences, to give the salt – the salt will remain in the bottle, and we will become ‘museum-piece Christians’. We can show the salt: this is my salt – and how lovely it is! This is the salt that I received in Baptism, this is what I received in Confirmation, this is what I received in catechesis – But look: museum-piece Christians! A salt without flavor, a salt that does nothing.

Cardinal Angelo Sodano and Cardinal Leonardo Sandri concelebrated, The Mass was attended by a group of priests and lay collaborators from the Congregation for the Oriental Churches.

Text from page http://en.radiovaticana.va/articolo.asp?c=694853
of the Vatican Radio website

 

Pope: Financial reform along ethical lines

Pope: Financial reform along ethical lines

2013-05-16 Vatican Radio

(Vatican Radio)“There is a need for financial reform along ethical lines that would produce in its turn an economic reform to benefit everyone.”… “Money has to serve, not to rule” Those were the Pope’s words to new Non Resident Ambassadors who were in the Vatican on Thursday to present their letters of credence. The new Ambassadors from Kyrgyzstan, Antigua and Barbuda, the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg and Botswana listened to Pope Francis as he spoke about a the financial crisis which we are experiencing that ultimately is, he said, as a result of a profound human crisis.

The Holy Father began his address to those present on a positive note by praising advances in various areas. These achievements he underlined, in fields such as health, education and communications can only benefit mankind.

But at the same time, the Pope went on to say, “the majority of the men and women of our time continue to live daily in situations of insecurity, with dire consequences… People have to struggle to live and, frequently, to live in an undignified way.” Read more